Your First Raspberry Pi: A Buyer’s Guide

Pi_2_Model_BI found this great post about the choices you need to make when buying your first Raspberry Pi. Although being a great guide when deciding about which model to choose and what complementary hardware you need, it is a bit outdated. I would recommend you read the guide, however with following additions:

Model A vs A+

This is the differences with A+ compared to the initial Model A:

  • More GPIO. The GPIO header has grown to 40 pins, while retaining the same pinout for the first 26 pins as the Model A and B.
  • Micro SD. The old friction-fit SD card socket has been replaced with a much nicer push-push micro SD version.
  • Lower power consumption. By replacing linear regulators with switching ones we’ve reduced power consumption by between 0.5W and 1W.
  • Better audio. The audio circuit incorporates a dedicated low-noise power supply.
  • Smaller, neater form factor. We’ve aligned the USB connector with the board edge, moved composite video onto the 3.5mm jack, and added four squarely-placed mounting holes. Model A+ is approximately 2cm shorter than the Model A.

Recommended for embedded projects and projects which require very low power, and which do not require Ethernet or multiple USB ports.

Mode B vs B+

Model B+ should not be mixed up with the Model B Rev 2 (which is simply a slightly updated Model B rev 1with minor differences). However, the differences between Model B and B+ is on the other significant.

  • More GPIO. The GPIO header has grown to 40 pins, while retaining the same pinout for the first 26 pins as the Model A and B.
  • More USB. We now have 4 USB 2.0 ports, compared to 2 on the Model B, and better hotplug and overcurrent behaviour.
  • Micro SD. The old friction-fit SD card socket has been replaced with a much nicer push-push micro SD version.
  • Lower power consumption. By replacing linear regulators with switching ones we’ve reduced power consumption by between 0.5W and 1W.
  • Better audio. The audio circuit incorporates a dedicated low-noise power supply.
  • Neater form factor. We’ve aligned the USB connectors with the board edge, moved composite video onto the 3.5mm jack, and added four squarely-placed mounting holes.

The Model B+ is perfectly suitable for use in schools: it offers more flexibility for learners than the leaner Model A or A+, which are more useful for embedded projects and projects which require very low power, and has more USB ports than the Model B.

The New Raspberry Pi 2

The Raspberry Pi 2 is the next generation of Model B/B+, and it is not even mentioned in the original post. It basically is a beefed up Model B+ with better CPU and more RAM, making it even more suitable for HTPC, NAS and similar usages.

Because it has an (quad-core) ARMv7 processor, it can run the full range of ARM GNU/Linux distributions, including Snappy Ubuntu Core, as well as Microsoft Windows 10. And due to being more powerful the “Pi 2” will be slightly more power-hungry compared to the Model B+ (up to about 0.5-1w more), and especially compared to the Model A+.

Original post

http://computers.tutsplus.com/tutorials/your-first-raspberry-pi-a-buyers-guide–mac-54134

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